Month: June 2016

Bookbub Strategy: Choose the Right Pricing Approach

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I make no secrets of my respect (almost love) for Bookbub.com advertising. My first Bookbub ad is what really kick-started my book sales, back in January 2015. Since then, I’ve been blessed to have my books featured with Bookbub (6) different times. Through these, I’ve identified some clear strategies for obtaining and pricing a Bookbub feature. Over the next week, we’ll talk through these strategies! Read the rest of this entry »

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Finding Your Target Reader

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The more I’ve delved into marketing and ways to find new readers, the more important it’s become for me to understand who my target reader is. What kind of people tend to fall in love with my books? (Not just those who can tolerate them.) Where do I find those people?

What kind of people fall in lovewith my books- 1

The deeper I go in this topic, the more I’m intrigued by it. The more I understand the freeing power of knowing my target reader, the more it influences my story lines, the types of characters I write about, the settings in each book, my book covers, back cover blurbs, types of advertising, you name it!

In other words, almost everything I do related to books centers around my target reader – making sure they can find my book, and then making sure they love it!

So how do you find that elusive person?
Read the rest of this entry »

The Most Effective Way to Grow Your Reader Email List

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With any book, especially a new release, the author/publisher/marketing team is striving to sell books to:

  1. Existing Readership
  2. New Readers

We’ll talk about finding new readers later, but in this post, let’s focus on selling new books to people who have already read your work.  Read the rest of this entry »

The (3) Essential Parts of a Book Launch Postmortem

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In the world of Project Management, a postmortem is a special meeting where the project list-clipart-dT8Rd9ATeteam reconvenes after everything is complete. We talk through what went right on the project and the parts we’ve all tried to forget. It’s a “lessons learned” session; a review so we’ll all actually learn those lessons and (hopefully) not make the same mistakes on the next project. It’s easy for these meetings to become finger-pointing sessions, but a good project manager will work to make the meeting a “safe zone.” A place where results can be assessed honestly.

A book launch is, in itself, a project. A short-term undertaking with start and finish dates. So I love the idea of holding my own private postmortem for each book launch. As I work to make each launch more successful than the last, I can focus on areas that yield strong results and ditch the efforts that were a waste. Also, this gives me a good pulse on how book marketing is evolving.

So let’s take a look at the (3) essential parts of a good postmortem, and I’ll use my recent launch as an example. Read the rest of this entry »